Top Health Tips this Summer Holiday Season

Updated: Feb 5, 2019


Summer is approaching.... With temperatures set to soar, it is important to keep comfortable in the hot weather and protect yourself from heat-related illness by taking some simple precautions.


TIPS TO BEAT THE HEAT

Keep hydrated

  • Drink lots of water.

  • Make sure you are carrying water with you when you are out and about.

  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine and tea. These can cause or worsen dehydration.

Keep cool

  • Stay indoors when you can. If going out, consider going to cool public places such as the cinema or the library.

  • Use fans or air conditioners at home.

  • Eat cold, fresh food, such as salads and fruit.

  • Wear light clothing.

  • Take cool showers or baths to help cool you down.

Reduce physical activity

  • Avoid unnecessary physical activity, especially during the hottest parts of the day (usually between 12 and 3pm).

  • However, don’t give up exercise altogether. If you usually exercise outdoors, opt for exercising indoors instead.

Protect yourself from the sun

  • Stay out of direct sun. Seek shade when outside.

  • When outside, wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and loose, comfortable clothing.

  • Wear sunscreen. SPF 15 should be used at a minimum, but the higher the SPF, the better. Remember to re-apply every 2 hours.

Protect yourself from the sun

  • Stay out of direct sun. Seek shade when outside.

  • When outside, wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and loose, comfortable clothing.

CHECK ON OTHERS

It is important to be alert and make sure to check on family members, friends and neighbours who are more vulnerable to heat and may need help coping with it – particularly children, the elderly, and people with medical conditions. Don’t forgot your pets at home too!

Never leave children or pets in an unattended car. Temperatures inside a car can rise to dangerous levels within a few minutes.

WATCH OUT FOR HEAT-RELATED STRESS

Heat-related stress occurs when someone is exposed to a hot environment which overwhelms their body’s ability to maintain a normal temperature. The risk is very high on days with a temperature over 28 degrees, and even higher during a heatwave. If not managed straight away, it can lead to heat stroke, which can be life threatening.

Heat can affect some people more than others. People at higher risk include:

  • Children and babies

  • Pregnant women

  • The elderly and frail

People who are unwell or who have disabilities

Early symptoms of heat-related illness include:

  • Headaches

  • Dizziness

  • Feeling faint

  • Nausea and vomiting

If you or someone you know is unwell, seek medical assistance right away. Come see one of our friendly doctors – our phone number is _____.

If there is a medical emergency – for example, if someone becomes unresponsive, confused or disorientated in the heat – call 000 immediately.



References

· ACT Health 2016, ‘Avoiding heat related stress,’ ACT Health, http://www.health.act.gov.au/datapublications/fact-sheets/emergencies-and-extreme-weather

· ACT Health 2016, ‘Tips to Beat the Heat!,’ ACT Health, http://www.health.act.gov.au/healthy-living/summer-safety/tips-beat-heat

· ACT Health 2016, ‘Your Guide to Summer Safety,’ ACT Health, http://www.health.act.gov.au/healthy-living/summer-safety

· Better Health Channel 2015 ‘Heat stress and heat-related illness,’ Victoria State Government, https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/heat-stress-and-heat-related-illness

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